Imperia

Arriving in Imperia from Capo Berta, before entering Oneglia, you will see several period villas surrounded by their gardens overlooking the sea.

Imperia, founded in 1923 as a result of the administrative amalgamation of several municipalities, the largest of which are Oneglia (Ineja) and Porto Maurizio (U portu), has a very old maritime history. It is the birthplace of several historical figures, including Andrea Doria, admiral, politician and Italian nobleman of the Republic of Genoa; San Leonardo of Porto Maurizio, creator and promoter of the Via Crucis (Way of the Cross), and Manuel Belgrano, father of the Argentine flag.

Merchandise destined for Piedmont and the Kingdom of Savoy travelled through here via the Impero Valley and Colle di Nava. The three smokestacks of the former ironworks, which dominate the port, are a sign of the town’s industrial past. The famous Agnesi pasta factory was also based here.

Imperia has discovered its vocation for tourism over the last few decades, with all kinds of important events and attractions, including “Vele d’Epoca”, a sailboat festival held every two years in the Port of Imperia, one of the largest in the Mediterranean.

Not to be missed are the Museo dell’Olivo (Olive Museum), the MACI – Museo arte Contemporanea Imperia (Museum of Contemporary Art in Imperia), the Museo Navale (Naval Museum), Villa Grock with the Clown Museum and Il Museo della comunicazione – Voci nell’etere (Museum of Communication – Voices in the Ether).

Moving further west from Imperia, between the provincial capital and Arma di Taggia, there are villages with a particular charm.

Imperia has discovered its vocation for tourism over the last few decades, with all kinds of important events and attractions, including “Vele d’Epoca”, a sailboat festival held every two years in the Port of Imperia, one of the largest in the Mediterranean.

Not to be missed are the Museo dell’Olivo (Olive Museum), the MACI – Museo arte Contemporanea Imperia (Museum of Contemporary Art in Imperia), the Museo Navale (Naval Museum), Villa Grock with the Clown Museum and Il Museo della comunicazione – Voci nell’etere (Museum of Communication – Voices in the Ether).

Moving further west from Imperia, between the provincial capital and Arma di Taggia, there are villages with a particular charm.

The route can be travelled along the ancient Via Aurelia, the road that connected Rome with Gaul, or along the footpath that runs all the way to Ospedaletti, with a priceless view of the open sea.

Immediately afterImperia, we come to the San Lorenzo Valley, home to five villages with unique characteristics. San Lorenzo al Mare, Cipressa, Civezza, Costarainera and, Pietrabruna, small but characteristic Ligurian villages capable of satisfying every desire, from the sea to the mountains.

Continuing westwards, Santo Stefano al Mare and Riva Ligure seem almost to be a single seaside town, and you can hardly tell where one ends and the other begins. In Terzorio and Pompeiana, the villages immediately inland, olive-growing has been replaced by flower-growing and now flowers, grown in greenhouses or outdoors, drive the economic decisions in these areas. Visit the SEM, Multimedia Exhibition Space at the Capo Don archaeological site in Riva Ligure.